Vol. 1 No. 1

Volume 1, Number 1, of Justice, Power and Resistance, the Journal of the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control was published in April 2017.

Subscriptions

Justice, Power and Resistance makes all content electronically available on an open access basis approximately 6 months after publication.  Therefore, the full content of Volume 1, Number 1 is available below. Hard copies are still available and can be ordered from EGPressProduction@outlook.com at the following prices:

UK £14
Rest of Europe 15€
Global South US$10
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Rest of World US20

Editorial: Critical Criminology

Author(s): 

Justice, Power & Resistance

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Papers

Vincenzo Ruggiero "Networks of greed"

Focusing on the grey areas in which white-collar crime joins and overlaps with conventional forms of organised criminality, the author identifies ‘networks of greed’ formed of individuals and groups from diverse social backgrounds and subcultures. Such grey areas thrive irrespective of booms and slumps and contain money laundering, tax evasion and bribes. A critical analysis of these three forms of financial crime is provided along with the description of the networks within which they take place.

Author(s): 

Vincenzo Ruggiero

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Alvesalo-Kussi et al "Corporate Criminal Liability and Abolitionism"

Abolitionists have, since the 1960s, importantly denounced incarceration as ineffective, notably in terms of deterrence. It is thought to increase human suffering. Abolitionists reject the concept of crime, dismiss punitive responses to social problems and propose that they should be dealt with outside the criminal justice system. Nevertheless, these calls for social justice are time and again declared by the establishment to be unfeasible, romantic illusions.  Yet, this article demonstrates that, when it comes to regulating the harmful acts of corporations, certain classic abolitionist arguments are taken seriously and conveniently co-opted by the establishment. Using unparalleled data concerning both law-making history and recent corporate fine sentences in Finland, we scrutinise the enactment and implementation of corporate criminal liability, and establish how select abolitionist arguments, often deemed impossible and demoralising in the context of individual offences, triumph when corporate interests are at stake.

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Bianchi "Abolition: Assensus and sanctuary"

After criticising the persistence and extension of the criminal justice system in Western societies and the failure of its objectives of adaptation and therapy, this text proposes a redefinition of norms from the point of view of abolitionism. It is stated that it is not necessary to create a new system of rules but to apply existing ones by redefining the terms to seek respect for human rights and to promote a system of reparation rather than one of punishment. The alternatives that are proposed to the system of punishment lie in the commitment to the resolution of conflicts by their own protagonists avoiding the use of bureaucratic strategies that co-opt those alternatives by incorporating them into the criminal justice system.

This paper was originally published in Bianchi, H. and Swaaningen, R. van (eds) (1985) Abolitionism: Towards a Non-repressive Approach To Crime Amsterdam: Free University Press

Author(s): 

Herman Bianchi

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Massimo Pavarini "Strategy for combat: prisoners’ rights and abolitionism"

There is a new centrality of the prison in the policies of social control. It is easy to conclude that the abolitionist strategy, which is manifestly failing, has unveiled that the revisionist penology which insisted upon the historical obsolescence of detention as punishment is scientifically erroneous. Personally, I think things are more complex. Maybe the time has come to critically review the abolitionist issue, above all today, faced with the dominance of a new ‘mass incarceration’.

Originally published in Pavarini, Massimo (2009) Castigar al enemigo. Criminalidad, exclusión e inseguridad. Quito: Flacso (pp. 127-143). Translated by Steven Kemp, University of Girona, Spain.

Author(s): 

Massimo Pavarini

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del Olmo "Limitations for the Prevention of Violence: The Latin American Reality and Its Criminological Theory"

The subject which I intend to discuss may seem exceedingly complicated, incoherent and vast. However, as I will try to show, its parts are closely related and they are not so complicated, but rather reflect different aspects of the same reality. By this I am referring to the reality of Latin American societies, characterised by their dependence, underdevelopment and more concretely by a heterogeneous socio-economic structure. It follows that Latin American violence has characteristics peculiar to it and it thus differs from that of developed nations. Moreover, as a result of the above, there exists a conception of criminological theory also peculiar to this continent and the result of the above. For the purposes of this essay, we have preferred to separate the different aspects of the subject at the outset so as to be able to develop a coherent synthesis. Thus, although we don't pretend to exhaust the problem of violence as an abstract and universal concept, we will begin by exploring what this concept means and what its implications are in Latin America.

 

Author(s): 

Rosa del Olmo

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Mantovan "Contested areas: Coexistence, conflict and governance in the districts near the railway stations of Padua and Mestre (North-eastern Italy)"

Certain trends underway in our cities today are particularly evident in areas near railway stations, including: an increasing social complexity, and ethnic and cultural diversity; social fragmentation; growing social exclusion; and the construction of material and symbolic boundaries between different social groups. The present article analyses these aspects by comparing the neighbourhoods around the railway stations of two cities in north-eastern Italy (Padua and Mestre – the latter is part of the municipality of Venice). The study investigates the problems experienced by the various urban populations in these areas, the reasons for the conflicts between them, and the actions taken by various public and private bodies mobilised to improve the quality of life in these districts. Adopting a critical criminological approach, the article deconstructs the dominant narratives describing petty crime as the biggest problem of this type of neighbourhoods, and delves into the actual consequences of ‘zero tolerance’ local policies and those which, on the contrary, seek to move in an inclusive direction.

Author(s): 

Claudia Mantovan

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Castle and McDonald "Intellectual Activism & Public Engagement: Strategies for Academic Resistance"

ACTIVIST CONTRIBUTION

Author(s): 

Tammy Castle and Danielle McDonald

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Justice, Power & Resistance "The Meaning of Justice"

In the ‘reflections’ section in volume 1 of the journal we provide brief, but focussed, discussions of the ideas of ‘justice’, ‘power’ and ‘resistance’. In this issue we consider the meaning of justice, drawing upon the insights of critical criminologists, most notably Barbara Hudson.

Author(s): 

Justice, Power & Resistance

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BOOK REVIEW: From #blacklivesmatter to black liberation. Keeanga Yamata Taylor

From #blacklivesmatter to black liberation. . Keeanga Yamata Taylor, Chicago: Haymarket Books (2016) 180pp £15.99 ISBN 978-1-60846-562-0

Author(s): 

Matt Clement

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BOOK REVIEW: Bastille Nation: French Penal Politics and the Punitive Turn. Jean Bérard and Gilles Chantraine

Bastille Nation: French Penal Politics and the Punitive Turn. Jean Bérard and Gilles Chantraine, Ottawa: Red Quill Books (2013) Translated by Matthew Cunningham. 204pp £20.00 ISBN 978-1-926958-22-4

Author(s): 

J M Moore

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